Nok

'God has given you one face, and yet you make yourself another' Shakespeare. Never conform to the status Quo. This blog is inspired by knowledge of the old world and truth. Email: Nok_ind@yahoo.com

theeducatedfieldnegro:

ingilwetrust:

nok-ind:

so-treu:

A scene from Sun Ra’s 1974 film, Space is the Place.

How do you know I’m real? I’m not real, I’m just like you. You don’t exist in this society. If you did, your people wouldn’t be seeking equal rights. You’re not real. If you were, you’d have some status among the nations of the world. So we’re both myths. I do not come to you as a reality, I come to you as the myth, because that’s what’s black people are: myths.”

you can see the full film here.

This is soo deep, they took Africans, forced the majority of them to forget their Language (Language is the DNA of a Culture, if you want to debate that just ask any trained anthropologist), forced them to disregard their culture, spirituality and even their Ethnicity (Which is very important in the motherland).  Thusly they adopted the type cast of being ‘Black’ (which doesn’t actually mean much as it doesn’t connect them to a Culture a geographical land or history. As it is just social conditioning). Becoming myth

One of the best films,ever. The infinite wisdom of Sun Ra and his Space Race.

He was truly ahead of his time. R.I.Saturn!

Reblogging this again in memory of Trayvon Martin. Listen to sun Ra’s words.

BBC documentary: Sun Ra, Brother From Another Planet

Sun Ra was born on the planet Saturn some time ago. The best accounts agree that he emerged on Earth as Herman Blount, born in Birmingham, Alabama in 1914, although Sun Ra himself always denied that Blount was his surname. He returned to Saturn in 1993 after creating a stunningly variegated and beautiful assemblage of earthly and interplanetary music, most notably with his fervently loyal Arkestra.

Sun Ra and his Arkestra were the subject of a few documentary films, notably Robert Mugge’s ’A Joyful Noise’ (1980), which interspersed performances and rehearsals with Sun Ra’s commentary on various subjects ranging from today’s youth to his own place in the cosmos. 

Today’s documentary, Don Letts’ ‘Sun Ra, Brother From Another Planet’  from 2005, reuses some of Mugge’s material and includes some additional interviews.

so-treu:

A scene from Sun Ra’s 1974 film, Space is the Place.

“How do you know I’m real? I’m not real, I’m just like you. You don’t exist in this society. If you did, your people wouldn’t be seeking equal rights. You’re not real. If you were, you’d have some status among the nations of the world. So we’re both myths. I do not come to you as a reality, I come to you as the myth, because that’s what’s black people are: myths.”

you can see the full film here.

This is soo deep, they took Africans, forced the majority of them to forget their Language (Language is the DNA of a Culture, if you want to debate that just ask any trained anthropologist), forced them to disregard their culture, spirituality and even their Ethnicity (Which is very important in the motherland).  Thusly they adopted the type cast of being ‘Black' (which doesn't actually mean much as it doesn't connect them to a Culture a geographical land or history. As it is just social conditioning). Becoming myth

(via occipitaloccult)

In tomorrow’s world, men will not need artificial instruments such as jets and space ships. In the world of tomorrow, the new man will ‘think’ the place he wants to go, then his mind will take him there.
— Sun ra
I’m dealing with the potential of people. I’m dealing with what they should be and what I see in them that isn’t there but should be there.
— Sun Ra
Now, this sickness and this death and all these things that happen here on earth are not necessary. It’s totally out of harmony, coordination precision and discipline.
— Sun Ra
Free-jazz & afrofuturism pioneer Sun Ra (the moniker ‘Ra’ taken from the eponymous Egyptian sun god), declared himself a messianic saviour and whose aesthetic was the first example of a black musician overtly appropriating sci-fi iconography. For him, Sun Ra was an alien abductee – and, through the prism of the African diasporic experience, so was every black American in a literal sense. Meanwhile the Egyptians – an eon-ruling race of beautiful and technologically-advanced African aristocracy – represented supremacy and a recaptured empire. View high resolution

Free-jazz & afrofuturism pioneer Sun Ra (the moniker ‘Ra’ taken from the eponymous Egyptian sun god), declared himself a messianic saviour and whose aesthetic was the first example of a black musician overtly appropriating sci-fi iconography. For him, Sun Ra was an alien abductee – and, through the prism of the African diasporic experience, so was every black American in a literal sense. Meanwhile the Egyptians – an eon-ruling race of beautiful and technologically-advanced African aristocracy – represented supremacy and a recaptured empire.

jazzpages:

BBC documentary: Sun Ra, Brother From Another Planet

Sun Ra was born on the planet Saturn some time ago. The best accounts agree that he emerged on Earth as Herman Blount, born in Birmingham, Alabama in 1914, although Sun Ra himself always denied that Blount was his surname. He returned to Saturn in 1993 after creating a stunningly variegated and beautiful assemblage of earthly and interplanetary music, most notably with his fervently loyal Arkestra.

Sun Ra and his Arkestra were the subject of a few documentary films, notably Robert Mugge’s ’A Joyful Noise’ (1980), which interspersed performances and rehearsals with Sun Ra’s commentary on various subjects ranging from today’s youth to his own place in the cosmos. 

Today’s documentary, Don Letts’ ‘Sun Ra, Brother From Another Planet’  from 2005, reuses some of Mugge’s material and includes some additional interviews.

 

(via diasporicroots)

Ultralite Powered by Tumblr | Designed by:Doinwork