Nok

'God has given you one face, and yet you make yourself another' Shakespeare. Never conform to the status Quo. This blog is inspired by knowledge of the old world and truth. Email: Nok_ind@yahoo.com

Kongo Graphic Writing and Other Narratives of the Sign. 
We all have indigenous religious systems and cosmologies we come from. It is important that we do not disregard them and forget them in favour of other people’s cosmologies. They connect us to our ancestors and to the world around us.  They are collectively part of the human story and world heritage

Kongo Graphic Writing and Other Narratives of the Sign.

We all have indigenous religious systems and cosmologies we come from. It is important that we do not disregard them and forget them in favour of other people’s cosmologies. They connect us to our ancestors and to the world around us.  They are collectively part of the human story and world heritage

historydepicted:

Here’s a big project I worked on a while ago, depicting the ancient glory and modern destruction of the Nubian pyramids at Meroë. The two images are shot from the same perspective so you can flip between them. To learn more about the Nubian culture, their relationship with Ancient Egypt, and why and when the pyramids were obliterated, check out the fuller history at historydepicted.com !

The Italians and british took this place apart due to greed and arrogance this has happened all over the continent. Our collective histories and cultures have been appropriated raped then disregarded.

(via diasporicroots)

The best and shortest road towards knowledge of truth is Nature.
— Proverb from the Great temple of Karnak
nok-ind:

Dahomey’s female hunters, the Gbeto, attack a herd of elephants.

nok-ind:

Dahomey’s female hunters, the Gbeto, attack a herd of elephants.

Lupita reminds me of a Kandake of kush. If they were going to make a film about the Kushites Lupita would play a Kandake. In the film she mush visit the Great temple of Ptah.

"Gaffou" by Salif Keita | SK* Session

Salif Keita is a descendent of Sundiata Keita founder of the Malian empire.

The Empire of ancient Ghana
The empire of ancient Ghana created by the Mende (Soninke) with human habitation dating back to at least around 4,000 BC.

Ancient Ghana was located in what is now southeastern Mauritania and western Mali.
Today the area around Dar Tichitt in southern Mauritania has been the subject of much archaeological attention, revealing successive layers of settlement near what still were small lakes as late as 1200 BCE. At this time people there built circular compounds, 60-100 feet in diameter, near the beaches of the lakes. (‘Compound’ is the name given to a housing type, still common today, in which several members of related families share space within a wall.) These compounds were arranged into large villages located about 12 miles from each other. Inhabitants fished, herded cattle and planted some millet, which they stored in pottery vessels. This was the last era of reasonable moisture in this part of the Sahara. By 1000 BCE the villages, still made up of compounds, had been relocated to hilltop positions, and were walled. Cattle were still herded, more millet was grown, but there were no more lakes for fishing. From 700-300 BCE the villages decreased in size and farming was reduced at the expense of pastoralism.

Architecturally, the villages of Dar Tichitt resemble those of the modern northern Mande (Soninke), who live in the savanna 300-400 miles to the south. These ancient villagers were not only farmers, but were engaged in trade connected with the salt and copper mines which developed to the north. Horse drawn vehicles passed through the Tichitt valley, bringing trading opportunities, ideas, and opening up the inhabitants to raids from their more nomadic northern neighbors. Development of the social and political organization necessary to handle commerce and defense must have been a factor in the subsequent development of Ghana, the first great Sudanic empire, in this part of West Africa.

It is very plausible to think that the people of antiquity in Ancient Ghana may be connected to the Ancient peoples who lived in the Sahara before it turned into dessert. Additionally Habitation of the region where the Ghana empire existed is much older than Western academics are aware of.

(Source: city-data.com)

THE AFRICAN SCIENCE BEHIND THE AFRICAN ZOO TYPES OF ANCIENT EGYPT

THE /UPPER NILE/NUBIAN ORIGINS OF ANCIENT EGYPTIAN WILDLIFE/ANIMALS AND ZOO TYPES.. THE SCIENCE BEHIND THE ANIMALS AND DIETIES OF ANCIENT EGYPT. EGYPT’S INDIGENOUS AFRICAN ANIMALS. THE METU NETER SYMBOLIC LANGUAGE ORIGINS

Ancient Egyptian “Blackness” in the Graeco-Roman Imagination

blackinasia:

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[image description: A bust of King Tutankhamun showing him with dark skin and text overlaying it, “Ancient Egyptian ‘Blackness’ in the Graeco-Roman Imagination”]

Alex Proyas’s new film “The Gods of Egypt" is getting ready for release in 2016, and to nobody’s surprise was formerly slated to have an all-white cast starring Gerard Butler, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau (from "Game of Thrones") and others. After a determined campaign by petitioners pushing for more historic accuracy, black actor, Chadwick Boseman was cast in a supporting role in the film adding a drop of color to the all-white cast. 

But why are we still having this discussion in the first place? Why does it take a petition drive for a white director making a film about ancient Egypt to think, “Oh wait, maybe ancient Egyptians didn’t look like they were from Scotland?” Why do Hollywood representations and the popular imagination of ancient Egyptians almost always cast them as either white people (in the modern sense) or as really “tan white people”?  I find conceptions and constructions of race and ethnicity to be fascinating, and have explored it in my research during college, and also on this site in my extended piece on conceptions of “Whiteness” in European contexts.

The “debate” on ancient Egypt, though, frankly bored me because race is not a biological but rather a social construct. For us to retroject our own conceptions of race onto the past is inherently anachronistic and so if “blackness” meant little to ancient Egyptians and the world they inhabited (despite them clearly being a black and brown people) then why should it matter to me?

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[image description: A movie still of the white British-American actress Elizabeth Taylor as Cleopatra in the 1963 film Cleopatra]

I was therefore fascinated to stumble across an extended work of scholarship by a young scholar named Tristan Samuels titled “The Riddle in the Dark: Rethinking ‘Blackness’ in Greco-Roman Racial Discourse.” In this extensive 146 page work, Samuels explores the constructions of “blackness” from the Greek and Roman perspective. These, the actual ”dark skinned white people” (in the modern sense) of antiquity clearly and systematically labeled and saw Egyptians and other peoples as “black” in their world (as a racial characteristic and parameter in “othering”), and so this “debate” did in fact matter. Much of this essay will therefore be spent exploring the ideas laid out in Samuels’ impressive work, but to start I’d like to explore how the ancient Egyptians saw themselves.

Read More

(Source: owning-my-truth)

There is a ridiculous lie that eurocentrics like propagate, which is that black Africans never even created the wheel. Below are ancient Saharan rock paintings (over 7,000 years old) showing horse drawn chariots.

Click here for more on the ancient Saharans.

(Source: city-data.com)

Our Ancestors will not accept mediocrity as their standards.

Ivan Van Sertima

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(via diasporicroots)

(via diasporicroots)

Ina Fandrich, "Yoruba Influences on Haitian Vodou and New Orleans Voodoo" [PDF]

(Source: conjureandsuch, via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

Religion is the deification of a people’s culture. Therefore religion empowers the people in who’s culture the religion is expressed. 
— Dr. Yosef Ben Jochannan
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